QuickTake: Nonelderly Workers with ESI Are Satisfied with Nonfinancial Aspects of Their Coverage but Less Satisfied with Financial Aspects


Adele Shartzer and Sharon K. Long

September 4, 2014


The Urban Institute's Health Reform Monitoring Survey has been tracking health insurance coverage, including employer-sponsored insurance coverage (ESI), since the first quarter of 2013. This QuickTake reports on nonelderly (ages 18–64) workers’ ESI in June 2014. In June 2014, most workers (88.6 percent) were insured and, among those who were insured, most (80.7 percent) had ESI (data not shown). When asked to assess their ESI, workers were generally satisfied with their ESI in terms of available health care services, choice of doctors and other providers, and the quality of the care available under the plan; less than 5 percent of nonelderly workers with ESI coverage report being dissatisfied with any of these factors (figure 1). However, satisfaction levels are much lower for the financial aspects of coverage, with workers more concerned about premiums, co-payments, and their potential financial risk from high medical bills. Nearly one in four nonelderly workers with ESI (23.4 percent) is dissatisfied with the premium they pay for coverage, and 27.2 percent are dissatisfied with the deductibles they pay when receiving care. The protection that ESI provides against high medical bills may be particularly limited for low-income nonelderly workers (those with family income at or below 138 percent of FPL) (figure 2): 32.1 percent of low-income workers with full-year ESI report having problems paying medical bills in the past 12 months. Overall, 14.2 percent of nonelderly workers with full-year ESI report having problems paying medical bills over the past 12 months.



Urban Institute Robert Wood Johnson Foundation